Writers

Jamie McGonnigal is a producer, director, actor, photographer, activist and organizer living in NYC. In 2003, he founded the World AIDS Day Concerts and has since produced more than 200 Broadway benefit concerts and events for dozens of LGBT and AIDS-related charities. Jamie spent the summer of 2007 working as a Senior Ambassador with the UN’s HERO Campaign in rural AIDS-affected communities in Namibia and South Africa. He also spent 3 summers serving as Camp Director for Camp TLC, a summer camp for inner-city teens living with HIV/AIDS. In 2008, Jamie started TalkAboutEquality.org as a tool to educate the LGBT community on the inequalities we face. Talk About Equality joined forces with Broadway Impact and organized 25 buses and more than 1400 people to attend The National Equality March in October, 2009. Then in 2010, Jamie started the Take Back Pride campaign, seeking to unify the work of LGBT organizations and use our Pride events to educate and activate our community and allies. Take Back Pride made its way into more than 17 communities and 4 countries in just a few months of organizing. In other news, Jamie’s voice can be heard most Saturday mornings on Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh! or Viva Pinata! and you can view some of his photography work at http://www.EqualityPhotography.com.


Sean Carlson is an organizer and trombonist from Washington, DC.   As a musician he has performed widely across the country and has worked with several orchestras on the east coast.  As an organizer he worked with Obama For America in 2008 and was a tour manager for the American Wind Symphony in 2009.  In late 2009 he worked to organize a music education community project in rural louisiana and most recently was the co-founder and lead organizer for The Big Commit: Exchanging Vows with Equality.  When not working or performing Sean is a youth mentor and avid runner.

10 Responses to “Writers”

  1. Amber Franks October 4, 2010 at 10:01 pm #

    I didn’t want to put this under your Oct. 1st post for fear of it getting lost with all the others but I wanted to share a project created by Dan Savage of the OC Weekly column Savage Love, and his partner. They started the It Gets Better Project on YouTube as a way for adults in the LGBT community to send messages of hope to young adults who may be considering suicide. I hope you share this with all your readers and with everyone you know. http://www.youtube.com/user/itgetsbetterproject#p/f/0/7IcVyvg2Qlo

    • Amber October 4, 2010 at 10:02 pm #

      lol never mind :) I found your site through the Freshly Pressed section and didn’t see todays post.

  2. Danny Cook November 17, 2010 at 4:45 pm #

    I for one have emailed Jeff.catlin@cumulus.com the following… Please let me know what I can do to change this for the better!

    Mr Catlin,

    The one thing that I will agree, that Chris Krok has said during his hate talk on the air is “This is a culture war”, yes that is true. Yet his hatred, un-balanced and half truths about the reason for “It Get Better” and “Bully Law” shows that your station continuously support his views. Not just once but when ever it is effective for Chris. He leaves out that a “Gay” youth is 4 times more likely to commit suicide than a “Straight” youth due largely from daily harassment and bullying at school. We all have the right to say what we wish, YET when we do those words should be held accountable.

    I for one will join in seeking out your sponsors, supply them with clips of Chris Krok’s hate, inaccurate and slanted comments and urge them to reconsider the worthiness to continue supporting your station.


    Thanks,
    Danny

  3. Ryan Young February 3, 2011 at 10:52 am #

    Hi Guys,

    I would love to talk about ways of working together. I am the EVP of Business Development and NYC Brand Ambassador for dot429.com. Check us out and let me know if you have any ideas for overlap!

    Best,

    Ryan

  4. Linda July 9, 2011 at 12:37 am #

    I just read in your recent article about the Bachman’s being a danger to the LGBT community that Marcus Bachman has more than once used the collective pronoun “we” rather than “they” in referring to “ex-gays”. This is really explosive info. I am just salivating at the thought of this “reparative therapy” “professional” getting outed! Can you provide more proof (videos, witnesses etc…) of him actually saying that? If so it needs to get out there now! Thanks for the great article btw.

  5. 3rdcultchild July 25, 2011 at 10:12 pm #

    Beautiful blog. Education is everything. At the end, it’s all about simple, basic human rights… People tend to forget about that.

  6. Ace August 2, 2011 at 8:02 am #

    This is a really great blog – thank you!
    We are bloggers in Leeds Uk – we have learning disablities and we blog about disability rights and disability hate crime. Have a look at our blog here:
    http://accessteamdisabilityblog.wordpress.com/

  7. Sherry Kelly August 10, 2011 at 12:55 pm #

    I would like to share my new Kickstarter campaign with you and your readers.

    Ally is 17, and her life has been turned upside because she explores & ultimately accepts her sexuality. The collateral damage she experiences includes bullying at school, loss of friends & family and, sadly, homelessness.

    Unfortunately, this is an all-too-true story for as many as 25% of LGBT teens. It is my sincerest wish that A Place Called Home brings even more attention to this tragic reality and furthers the dialogue that has been started.

    This is the basis for my film, A Place Called Home. Please visit my Kickstarter campaign: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/aplacecalledhome/a-place-called-home.

    And, please, share the link with your family and friends. Thank you.

  8. Sherry Kelly August 10, 2011 at 1:00 pm #

    I would very much like to share my Kickstarter campaign with you and your readers.

    Ally is 17, and her life has been turned upside because she explores & ultimately accepts her sexuality. The collateral damage she experiences includes bullying at school & loss of friends & family and, sadly, homelessness.

    This is the basis for my indie film, A Place Called Home. It is my sincerest hope that A Place Called Home brings further attention to this tragic situation and furthers the dialogue that has already been started.

    Please visit my Kickstarter campaign:

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/aplacecalledhome/a-place-called-home.

    You can also visit our website at http://www.apch2011.webs.com.

    And, please, share our link and/or website with your family and friends.

    Thank you.

  9. Jason J. September 29, 2011 at 4:05 pm #

    Hello:

    I have been reading the paper and watching the news regarding Jamey Rodemeyer and the one missing component that I am not hearing is anyone distinguishing Homophobic Bullying from other types of bullying as they are completely separate. I wish to include a portion of my graduate thesis http://jasonjdotbiz.wordpress.com/ if for no reason than to raise awareness. Thank you

    “Homophobic bullying is not like other types of bullying. If a student is bullied based on race, religion, their weight etc., they can run home to an understanding (often relatable) parent/family who understands their pain and can console them. Gay youth do not have that refuge as they 1) Are usually not out to themselves yet, and 2) fear being thrown out of their homes and family. This pent up frustration, hurt and anger eventually leads to what has (sadly) been happening in the media as of late.”

    Jason Galvez

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